Outdoor Kitchen

The idea came forth to build an outdoor kitchen because we wanted to prep vegetables and can fruit outside. After removing a non-functioning hot tub and a wobbly deck, the area was perfect for the kitchen.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

After the hot tub and deck were removed, the space was now clear to design the outdoor kitchen.  The location of the beams for the counter and roof supports were laid out using 6×6 lumber left over from the Compost Manure Bunker.  The beams milled to be very large because we want to support a Green Roof.  The design I created also did not include any metal brackets or vertical brackets to support the beams.

The area was spray painted to determine the size and location of a pathway between the Cordwood Studio and Brick Patio.  A sketch was made and lumber ordered from miller Jason Vincent.

In August 2013, our contractor Ian built the framework for the cement pad.  We knew we wanted the pad larger and higher than what was already in place.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Base gravel was then added, and deep holes were dug to cement in the redwood posts.  In order to avoid using metal brackets for the posts, the beams were cemented in before pouring the cement pad.

Also, the location of the sink was determined so that the pipes for water and drainage could be added.  Water is coming from the sprinklers which we don’t use anymore since we removed all the grass.  Drainage for the sink will go into the landscaping as grey water.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The beams were cemented in the holes.  The beams were sized so that the front row was shorter than the back row to allow for a slanted roof.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

After the beams were in place, Jason Vincent suggested we cut down the Douglas Fir tree in front of the house.  We were planning on removing the tree eventually because it was split at the top and a danger to the house.  Before adding the roof to the kitchen, Jason thought the tree should be removed in advance.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The next step in the project is to get the cement pad poured.  In the meantime, we are working on the hardscaping, and a new path has been added.

November, 2015

November, 2015

In October, 2016 (3 years after the frame was built), cement was poured by Eric Hammer Construction.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

At the end of December, 2016, river rocks were added around the cement pad to walk in and out of the kitchen.

On January 6, 2017 Jordan Booth welded three floating shelves for one of the 6×6 redwood beams.  Please read the Blog Post: Floating Metal Shelves to learn more about the design and process.  Now, the roof can be started!

On Friday, March 10, 2017 a 6x8x16 foot redwood beam was custom milled and delivered by Dave Merchant of Out of the Woods Mill http://outofthewoodsmill.com/services/

DSCN2795

I already had 2 of the 3 beams milled about 5 years ago by Jason Vincent, and they have been sitting around.  I needed one more beam, and through a referral, found Dave Merchant. I originally wanted a heavy-duty size (6×8) because I was going to do a “green” roof.  We are now opting for a traditional roof with a skylight from a recycled patio door.

On Monday, April 3, 2017, Rich Wilhelmsson and his friend Tarek spent the day installing the three beams.  The goal for this year, 2017, is to get electrical lights and roof added.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The lights were installed in June by Jeff Sheets of Electric Electric.  He gave great advice and will be returning to finish the switches and outlets once the cabinets are built in a year or two.

August 2017

August 2017

DSCN3246